Archives for : adoption

Cat Breeds 101: The Russian Blue

The striking golden eyes and silky grey coat of a Russian Blue is striking for any cat lover

The striking golden eyes and silky grey coat of a Russian Blue is striking for any cat lover

The Russian Blue is a delightful cat that is most notable for having a striking dark grey, or blue, coat. Russian Blues are one of the oldest recorded breeds of cats, first making an appearance in the 1860s. They are smart, yet shy, and love to hunt mice and other rodents. Here, we’re going to talk about everything there is to know about this delightful breed.

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Best Breeds For Cat Lovers With Allergies

cat cats kitten calico allergies

Cat allergies are no laughing matter

Allergies to cats are no laughing matter; approximately 10% of the U.S. population suffers from pet allergies and cats are at the top of the list. Cat allergies can vary from extreme to mild, depending on the person. If you are one of the people afflicted with cat allergies, but are a cat lover, you do have some options. If your allergies are extreme, you may want to consult your doctor for allergy treatment or look into medically-designed hypoallergenic cats. However, for those who have mild allergies, we’ve compiled a list of cat breeds that are known to be hypoallergenic or that tend to distribute less allergens for a variety of reasons.

Cat allergies are caused by the prevalence of Fel D1, an enzyme in cats’ saliva. When a cat grooms his/herself, they use their tongue and spread Fel D1 all over their fur. This fur is then spread throughout the house. Hypoallergenic cats are cat breeds that either produce less Fel D1 or shed little or not at all. Remember that hypoallergenic does not mean that they are entirely allergen-free; just that they are less likely to set off an allergic person’s allergies.

Our favorite cat breeds for people with allergies are:

1. The Rex Cats: This includes the Devon Rex and the Cornish Rex. Both of these cats have a coat that sets them apart from other cats; they lack guard hairs and are only covered in the fur that lies beneath. Technically, these cats aren’t hypoallergenic, but the lack of guard hairs makes their shedding more tolerable for many people with allergies.

cornish rex colorpoint black white

The Cornish Rex’s short fur doesn’t spread like that of cats with guard hairs

2. The Sphynx Cat: The Sphynx cat is hairless, and therefore shedding is no longer an issue with this breed. Sphynx cats still lick and groom themselves, but without fur to shed, the spread of their allergens is much less.
3. The Russian Blue: The Russian Blue is hypoallergenic for two main reasons. First of all, their double coat helps to keep in allergens rather than spreading them throughout the house. They also produce less Fel d1, the main property that produces cat allergies.
4. The Balinese: The Balinese has long hair and a full coat, but don’t let this deter you. They produce less Fel D1, the main perpetrator of feline allergies.
5. The Bengal: Bengals have short, dense fur that doesn’t shed much. They spread less dander and fur around and have been known to spread less allergens than other cats.
6. The Javanese: The Javanese is one of only a few breeds that lacks an undercoat, making them shed less. Less shedding means less spreading of allergens

siberian forest cat piano grey

The Siberian may seem unlikely to be hypoallergenic due to their long fur, but they produce little Fel D1

7. The Siberian: Siberian cats have a medium-length coat, which would make many allergy-sufferers hesitant to the breed. However, Siberian cats have been known to have less enzyme levels in their saliva, which is a key source for allergens.
8. The Laperm: The Laperm is a curly-haired cat, and many Laperm owners believe that they are hypoallergenic. They have been known to shed less than other breeds, and many people with cat allergies have had little to no reaction to Laperms.
9. The Oriental Shorthair: The Oriental Shorthair breed has such short hair that sheds so little that they’ve been one of the most popular cat breed for allergy sufferers.

All of these breeds have been known to produce less allergens for a variety of reasons, but there are some other factors that influence how allergenic a cat will be. When choosing a cat for your household, taking the following factors into consideration may help someone with mild allergies find a cat that doesn’t make their sinuses explode:

Male cats produce more allergens than females: This is another unsolved mystery, but for whatever reason, female cats produce less allergens. If you have mild cat allergies, you may want to adopt a female cat.
Neutered males produce less allergens than unfixed males: When a male cat is neutered, his hormones change and he produces less allergens. You should always have your animals spayed and neutered regardless, but especially if you have allergies.
Kittens produce less allergens than full-grown cats: You may not be allergic to a kitten, but develop allergies to the same cat once they grow up for this reason. This, among many other reasons, is why adopting an adult cat is a good idea. This way, you will know right off the bat whether or not you are allergic to a particular cat and can avoid having to make the painful decision of what to do with a cat that is causing you terrible allergies.
Dark-colored cats produce more allergens than light-colored cats: For whatever reason, lighter-colored cats produce less allergens. So instead of a black or dark orange cat, lean towards a cat that has white as their base color.

Are you a cat-lover dealing with cat allergies? Let us know how you handle them in the comments!

The Top 5 Cat Breeds For Kids

cat kitten tabby kids children family friendly

Cats and children can get along famously with the right guidance

When picking out a new furry friend, it is important to make the right choice for your household. For some, the most important thing is choosing a cat that gets along with dogs; for others, a cat that is low maintenance is of utmost importance. However, if you’ve got a household with children in it, you’ll want to bring home a kitty that will do well with your children. Cats can be great companions for children of any age.

Besides their breed, there are certainly other factors that go into a cat’s willingness to tolerate and get along with children. Some of the most important factors of a cat’s behavior include:

Age: A cat’s temperament and behavior changes over time along with their age. A kitten may have no idea how to peacefully interact with adults and children alike. Many kittens can’t distinguish between play and real fighting and can end up biting or scratching harder than they intended to. On the other end, elderly cats often become senile and may behave in a similarly inappropriate manner.
Background history: For any animal, early exposure to humans is key when it comes to socialization. If you are adopting an adult cat, you may be able to get information on their background and be able to select a cat that is notable for getting along with children. Most cats can learn trust and tolerance over time, but the earlier and more exposure that any given cat has had with children, the more likely they’ll be able to get along. If you’re getting a kitten, it is important to socialize them early on and teach them desirable behaviors.
Health: One of the most common symptoms of a cat with a health problem is a change in their behavior; usually negative. If a cat has a health problem that is causing them pain, they will likely have a shorter temper and therefore be less tolerant of children and playtime.

As you can see, many factors go into a cat’s willingness to get along with children, and you can’t bank on one breed being guaranteed to get along with children. However, certain breeds have been known over time to be extra calm, outgoing, and tolerant of children. The following breeds are our suggestions for cat-friendly felines:

Maine Coon: The Maine Coon is the largest housecat in the world. These gentle giants are known to be calm, patient, and easygoing. They’ll still play and entertain your household, but would rather take a nap and hang out than explore most days. Maine Coons have long, fluffy fur and require brushing so that their hair doesn’t become matted, adding a bit more responsibility than a short-haired cat. However, this responsibility could be a great lesson for a child.

American Shorthair: American Shorthairs are the most common kind of cat found in the U.S. These cats’ personalities can vary greatly, but a well-adapted and socialized American Shorthair would be a great cat for a family. They come in every color that a cat can be, giving you lots of options for aesthetics. American Shorthairs are known to be energetic and outgoing,

Ragdoll: Ragdolls are not only adorable, but kind and silly. They get their name from the breed’s peculiar habit of flopping in a ragdoll-like manner when picked up. This is a great trait for a cat to carry, especially in a family with children who will most likely want to pick the cat up. Their ragdoll nature makes them less fussy and less likely to use their claws or teeth to get out of a situation.

Persian: Persian cats like to be the life of the party and the center of attention, which could work out well for a family with playful children. Their squishy faces and fluffy tails are endlessly entertaining to look at, and they only require a medium amount of maintenance depending on the length of their hair. Persians are usually very tolerant in nature, and would be great with kids.

Abyssinian: One reason an Abyssinian would be a great cat for a household with children is their brave nature and outgoing personality. Abyssinians are known to thrive in family situations, as they enjoy the constant energy and stimulation. They may not be lap cats, but they’re great for endless entertainment and lots of playtime.

cat kids children orange tabby

This kitty appears to be very child-friendly!

Regardless of what breed you decide to go with, kids need to know how to interact with a cat if they’re going to try to befriend one. No matter how well-socialized your cat is, or how much they’ve enjoyed kids in the past, it is important to teach your kids how to behave appropriately with a furry friend. Even the nicest cat can snap when being tickled too hard or having their tail pulled. The following are some tips to teach your children in order to keep the peace between them and your cats:

Never pull a cat’s tail, paws, ears, or other extremities: This one may seem obvious, but for a child who isn’t familiar with felines, this is rule number one.
Always let a cat sniff you when first greeting: Whether you’re greeting a cat that you’ve known for years, or meeting a new one, you should always let a cat sniff you upon first greeting. This way, you can get a sense of the cat’s mood and let them set the tone for affection.
If a cat seems agitated or annoyed, don’t push it: Sometimes it is hard to explain to kids why a cat wouldn’t want to play with them, but once they learn to be patient and let the cat come to them, the relationship can begin to form.
Be patient when meeting a new cat: Similar to leaving an agitated cat alone, it’s important to be calm when meeting a new kitty. Some cats are more outgoing than others, and a shy cat needs time to prepare to meet a stranger.
Pet the kitty shoulders to tail: For children (and adults) who aren’t familiar with cats, a simple first reaction would be to pet a cat’s soft underbelly. Unfortunately, this is the easiest way to have a bad interaction with a cat, since 90% of cats will bite or claw when their tummies are touched, even if they’re exposing them. Teaching a child to pet from the cat’s shoulders and along the back to the tail will help them get along better and quicker.
Be careful with picking a cat up: Picking a cat up requires a level of trust that takes time between a cat and a person. Help your child read the body language of your cat and let them know when your cat might let you pick them up, or if your cat is the type that never wants to be handled.

Teaching your child these rules and helping them understand kitty’s body language will result in a more peaceful home, and help protect your child against harmful bites and scratches. Cats are only barely domesticated and will always revert back to their feline ways if they’re pushed too far. When introducing a new cat into your home, you should monitor the cat and small children together at all times for the first few months. Cats can be unpredictable, and it is hard to tell if they’ll get along with children right off the bat.

As long as you keep the peace and monitor your children’s behavior with your cat and your cat’s behavior in general, you can have a happy and harmonious home. Make sure to check out our articles on how to introduce cats to each other, and how to introduce cats and dogs as well.

Do you have a cat and child that get along famously? Leave your story in the comments!

Cat Breeds 101: The Savannah Cat

Savannah_Cat_portraitThe Savannah cat is a Serval and domestic hybrid, and one of the largest house cats, if you can call it that. Many people adopt Savannah cats for their large size, their exotic looks, and their dog-like temperament. The serval is a medium-sized african cat hailing from sub-saharan Africa, and mates with a domestic cat to produce the Savannah cat. The Savannah cat is revelled for having a temperament closer to that of a domestic cat but boasting the looks of the exotic serval.

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How To Have A Cat In College

Smart Cat Writing With Books On WhiteSo, you’re in college, and you desperately miss your cat from home. If you’re used to having pets, going from a fur-filled household to a college campus can be a huge change. It’s important to get that animal interaction that you’re so used to, and there are a variety of ways to make it happen. If you are in desperate need of feline affection, we’ve got some great ways to have a cat in college right here.

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How To Warm Up A Shy Kitty

Stray Cat Peering Through The DoorCats are much like people in so many ways. They each have their own quirks, affections, and personalities. When raising a cat from a kitten, you have lots of control over the way that they’ll end up when it comes to behavior. Kittens tend to be naturally curious but also shy since they’re so new to this big world. Adult cats can be shy for a variety of reasons. If you’re dealing with a shy cat, there are many ways to help your kitty feel calm and comfortable in their home, ultimately leading to a less shy cat.

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How Many Cats Is Too Many?

One cat grooming another cat isolated on grey background.Is becoming the “crazy cat lady” a self-fulfilling prophecy? Is there a set number of square footage required per cat? Many cat owners desire to add a second cat to their household; if not for their own enjoyment, to get their first kitty a friend. Having a cat is awesome, and having two is even better. Most households can accommodate two cats in even the smallest of quarters. However, when adopting even just one cat it is important to fully understand how much space, time, energy, and money you’ll need to provide for your new pack,

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How To Adopt The Right Cat For You

Young woman holding cat and old book, close-upWhen adopting a cat, its important to know what you’re looking for in personality and temperament. Are you looking for a cuddle buddy, a playful pal, or a relaxed roommate? There are many different factors that can affect the way that your cat behaves. You can never be completely sure how your cat will act, but there are certain things you can choose and pay attention to when selecting your furry friend.

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7 Reasons to Adopt an Adult Cat

Cute cat enjoying his life outdoors.We all love cats for their affection, their companionship, and their entertainingly curious nature. When making the decision to invite a new cat into your life, it’s important to figure out what you’re looking for. A variety of factors can influence the cat’s temperament and behaviors, including age, breed, gender, and more. Many people assume that getting a kitten is the best option, but in many cases, getting an adult cat can be the best choice. If you’re thinking about getting a cat, read our list to see if adopting an adult cat is the best option for you.

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